Mary Margaret McKee McKay

Descendants of Mary Margaret McKee

Generation No. 1

        1.  Mary Margaret28 McKee  (Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born Abt. 1797 in Abbeville County, South Carolina, and died Abt. 1843 in Jefferson County, Missouri.  She married Samuel Milton McKay Bef. 1816 in South Carolina.  He was born 1787 in South Carolina, and died Aft. 1850 in Texas.

 

Notes for Mary Margaret McKee:

From Wayne Adams

 

Sources include 1850-60C, West Side Stories by Gladys Castleberry and the Wideman family history [based on info.fm. Fern Hunt of Salt Lake City.]

 

Her father’s brother [Wm.Seth McKEE] married Samuel McKAY’s sister?-Mary F.

Their oldest son [“Billy, the Pioneer Preacher”] brought Sam Jr’s children back to MO ca.1858-9 but she was too feeble for the trip & remained in Grayson County, TX until her death in the early 1860s [per West Side Stories article].

 

Fern HUNT’s group sheet shows Samuel’s 2nd marriage to Margaret MURRELL and that Mary died ca. 1843.  Betty Harman picked up on the 1850-60C in Grayson Co, TX showing Margaqret b c1797 in SC in “Purce” household with Isabella & N.P.  Consistent with the West Side article.

 

 

 

HISTORY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, MISSOURI AND HISTORY OF THE LEE FAMILY

by Mr. Charles Oliver Lee

 

William McKay’s mother was a daughter of Michael McKee who came from Abbeville, South Carolina, about 1815 to 17 and settled in Missouri. Samuel McKay, Uncle Billy’s father, and Mary F. McKay, a sister of Samuel, came in the same wagon trail with Michael McKee and his brothers, William S. and Harvey, and a sister, Rebecca. William Seth McKee, brother of Michael, married Mary F. McKay, probably before leaving South Carolina. It is also probable that Samuel McKay married the daughter of Michael McKee before leaving South Carolina [1811], and it is possible Uncle Billy was born in South Carolina. The father of the above-mentioned McKee family was Adam McKee who came from Scotland during the Revolutionary War and settled at Abbeville, South Carolina.

 

From Wayne Adams

 

MARY McKEE was one of the two daughters “under age 10” on the 1800 Federal Census for Abbeville District, SC.  MARY was the ancester of Fern HUNT (whose extensive research on the McKEE/McKAY line provides the “heart” of the input on the International Genealogical Index relating to the line & who was quoted as the primary source of information on this branch in the WIDEMAN Family History, newspaper articles, etc.) and Gladys Lee CASTLEBERRY whose newspaper article entitled West Side Stories–McKays and McKees Come to Jefferson County provides unique insights into the lives of SAMUEL & MARY McKAY.  The next several paragraphs borrow extensively from these sources.

MARY McKEE  — married —  SAMUEL McKAY “Sr.”

c1797-c1842                c1787-after 1850

|

———————————————————————-

|                    |               |               |                |

William Ruen      Samuel Milton      Michael S.       Isabel        Mary (“Polly”)

1817-1902         c1819-1859        1821-1896      c1826-c1874       c1831-

 

plus a daughter born 1825-30 and one born 1830-35 (per 1840 census)

Based upon information given to census takers, MARY was born ca.1797 (although possibly as early as 1795) in SC.  Since there were four children under age ten in MICHAEL’s household on the 1800 Census for Abbeville District, we can conclude that MARY was the second or third child born during MICHAEL’s first marriage.  She grew up on the family plantation on Jobs Creek of the Long Cane near what is now  in Abbeville County, SC. (see the section on MICHAEL Sr and the SC McKEE narrative).  As with the others from the clan who married while residing in South Carolina’s highlands, there is nothing to document the precise date of marriage, but she married SAMUEL McKAY some time prior to 1816.  MARY’s Uncle WILLIAM SETH McKEE (who was only a couple years older than she was or possibly even the same age) married MARY F. McKAY (believed to have been SAMUEL’s sister) during 1811, according to several different sources.  MARY may have been anywhere between age 14 and age 19 when she married.  Their oldest (known) child was William Ruen McKAY who was born 19 Nov 1817.

Gladys CASTLEBERRY’s father described his great-grandfather (SAMUEL McKAY) as “a rolling stone” living first one place and then another.  He was of Scotch-Irish descent and was born ca.1787.  SAMUEL’s place of birth was uncertain.  As noted in the SC McKEE/McKAY segment, there were a couple clusters of McKAYs in middle & western South Carolina but no documented McKAY settlements in Abbeville District.  This would tend to corroborate that the McKAYs were a family in perpetual motion, seldom remaining in one place from one census to the next.

At roughly two year intervals, three sons were born to SAMUEL & MARY McKAY:

WILLIAM RUEN born 19 Nov 1817

SAMUEL MILTON born ca.1819

MICHAEL S. born 1 Nov 1821

Family group sheets identify two of the four daughters reflected by census records:

ISABEL born ca. 1826

(census records show another daughter born before 1830)

MARY, nicknamed “POLLY” born ca. 1831

(census records show another daughter born 1830-35)

There may have been other children born to this couple who did not survive long enough to be included in a census enumeration.

MARY (McKEE) McKAY died ca.1842 in Jefferson County, MO.  After her death, SAMUEL married MARGARET MURRELL.

During the time the family resided in Jefferson County, MO, Gladys CASTLEBERRY’s father recounted that SAMUEL made at least one trip to Texas and back.  “Sometime about 1850” (before the census taker came around) SAMUEL Sr. (& wife), SAMUEL Jr (& wife), ISABEL (& husband) and POLLY went to Texas.  Enroute – as Gladys CASTLEBERRY’s father continued the account – while camping alongside the trail, some men from another wagon train camped nearby, visited and one of the men “bantered SAMUEL Sr. for a horse trade”.  When SAMUEL responded to a question about the horse’s age, the stranger “called Grandfather Samuel a liar”.  Now SAMUEL had been described as “a drinking, fighting Irishman who would permit no man to insult him without a fight” and as he had a skillet in his hand, preparing to fry meat, the skillet collided with the stranger’s head, knocking him out.  His friends assisted the stranger back to their camp but there were concerns that the blow might prove fatal, so it seemed advisable that SAMUEL “stay off the trail a few days”.  He was never seen or heard from again by his family.

WILLIAM (“Uncle BILLY”) McKAY, who along with his brother MICHAEL McKAY had remained in Missouri, went to Texas “about 1858 or 1859” and brought some of the family back with him.  However they decided that MARGARET was too feeble to make the trip and she remained in Grayson County, Texas.  She was listed on the 1860 census (age 63, born in SC) and remained in Texas until her death during the early 1860s.  After her death, POLLY & ISABEL also returned to MO with their families. In 1976, when the West Side Stories article appeared, they were still seeking to identify which of MICHAEL McKEE’s daughters SAMUEL McKAY had married, but information from Fern HUNT “fills in the blanks”, including the second marriage.

 

Now, more about the children of SAMUEL & MARY McKAY:

WILLIAM RUEN McKAY; 19 Nov 1817- 21 Nov 1902 (whose line was documented in the WIDEMAN Family History) married ADELINE WILSON, the daughter of JACOB JUSTUS WILSON on 28 Jan 1829 in Jefferson County, MO.  Fondly known as “UNCLE BILLY”, he was to be the subject of a second article by Gladys CASTLEBERRY (which I haven’t seen) entitled Great-Uncle Billy McKay, the Pioneer Preacher.

The WILSON family also came from Abbeville District, SC but Grandfather EPHRAIM WILSON reportedly brought his family to Missouri a few years after the McKEEs and McKAYs arrived.  Undoubtedly they knew each other in SC as well.

?

 

 

More About Mary Margaret McKee:

Burial: Jefferson County, Missouri

 

Notes for Samuel Milton McKay:

From Wayne Adams

 

Described as “a rolling stone”; family tradition (unproven) that he disappeared enroute  to Texas (around Red River area)  after hitting a stranger over the head with a skillet for calling him a liar.

Some uncertainty as to whether 1st  wife died in MO and he remarried or whether she was the Margaret McKay on 1850-60 census for Grayson Co, TX but in any event Samuel Sr was NOT found in the McKay/ “Purse”/ Strickland cluster

 

HISTORY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, MISSOURI AND HISTORY OF THE LEE FAMILY

by Mr. Charles Oliver Lee

 

Sometime about 1813, there was a wagon train left Abbeville, South Carolina, for Missouri. In this train came the ancestors of the McKays and the McKees of Jefferson County. Just how many of each family came is not known to the writer. However, it is known that Michael and William Seth McKee and families came. They were the sons of Adam McKee who came from Scotland during the Revolutionary War and settled at Abbeville, South Carolina. William S. McKee married Mary F. McKay in South Carolina some two or three years before coming to Missouri [1811], according to the information of writer and Samuel McKay, thought to be a brother of Mary F. McKay, married a daughter of Michael McKee a year or two before leaving South Carolina and came to Missouri with his father-in-law. Michael McKee seems to have been considerably older than his brother, William Seth, as he had a daughter old enough to be married before leaving South Carolina.

 

Samuel McKay was of Scotch-Irish descent and must have been born near 1787. Whether he was born in America is not known, but it seems probable he was. According to the information at hand, he had one or two children when he came to Missouri. His children were as follows: William born 1816, Samuel Jr., date of birth not known, Isabel, Michael born 1821, and Polly. He seems to have been a “rolling stone” and lived first at one place and then another in Jefferson County, until about the middle of the 19th century. Previous to that time he had made a trip to Texas and back. [In 1847, son Michael McKay married Betty Wilson and reared a family on Jones Creek. They are C. 0. Lee’s grandparents. See John Robert Wilson Family.] Sometime about 1850, he [Samuel McKay], his wife, son Samuel, daughters, Isabel, who had married a Pierce, and Polly started to Texas. He was a drinking, fighting Irishman who allowed no man to insult him without a fight. One night after they had gotten pretty near their destination they stopped by the side of the trail, as usual, to camp for the night. Nearby, another wagon train had camped for the night. Some of the men from the camp came to the McKay camp, and while there bartered Samuel for a horse trade. The stranger asked how old the horse was and on being told he called Samuel a liar. He was preparing to fry meat in a heavy skillet and he struck the stranger on the head with the skillet and knocked him out. The friends of the injured man took him back to camp. That night the McKays decided that the injured man might be fatally injured and that Samuel had better get away that night and stay off the trail a few days. So he left in the night with the understanding he would join them on the trail farther on in a few days. He was never seen or heard from again by his family. This information was given the writer by Uncle Seth W. McKee, a half brother of Samuel McKay’s wife, and he said he got it through Nathan Pierce, a son-in-law of Mr. McKay, who was present when the incident occurred. So where, when and how Samuel McKay met death none of his family ever knew.

 

The other members of the party continued on to their destination. The son, Samuel Jr., and wife died in a few years leaving four children. Uncle Billy, oldest son of Samuel McKay, Sr., went to Texas about 1858 or 1859 and brought the children back to Missouri. He expected to bring his mother back, too, but they decided she was too feeble to undertake the trip. She remained with her daughters, Mrs. Pierce and Polly, until her death in the early 1860’s. After her death, Aunt Polly and the Pierce family came back to Missouri.

 

 

 

What Ever Happened to Samuel McKay?

1850 , Unknown

 

Samuel McKay was a drinking, fighting Irishman, who would never allow a man to insult him without a fight.  Sometime in 1850 his family hit the trail traveling from Jefferson County, Missouri to Texas.  After traveling most of the way to their destination, they stopped by the side of the trail to camp for the night.  Nearby, another wagon had stopped to camp for the night as well.

 

While Samuel was preparing to fry meat for their dinner, some men from the neighboring camp approached Samuel, trying to persuade him to trade his horse.  At some point during the exchange, one the men asked Samuel the age of his horse.  Apparently the man was not convinced of Samuel’s answer and called him a liar.   Samuel enraged at the accusation, swung and struck the man on the head with the heavy skillet in his hand, knocking him out.  The friends of the injured man carried him back to their camp.

 

Later that evening, the McKay family decided that it was quite possible that Samuel had killed the man when he struck him.  It was decided that Samuel should leave during the night and stay off the trail for a few days, in case the man was fatally wounded.  Samuel was to meet them farther down the trail in a few days.  The McKay family continued on the trail the next day and never saw or heard from Samuel again.  “What ever happened to Samuel McKay?” is a question the McKay family never has answered.

 

This story was originally told

 

 

 

 

From Genforum

Samuel Milton McKAY, Sr, Connections

Posted by: Lynn McKay    Date: January 14, 1999 at 14:29:26

of 2226

Bottom of Form 2

 

Am trying to connect in Scotland or Ireland for Samuel Milton McKAY, Sr. According to family tradition, they were landowners in Scotland but were on the “wrong side” with Bonnie Prince Charlie, and fled thru Ireland to the USA.

Samuel is first located in SC with the McKEE’s and WILSON’s near Abbeville in early 1800’s. He may have been born in SC, Ireland or Scotland. He married Margaret McKEE ca 1813-15 in SC, and his sister Mary F married Margaret’s uncle, William Seth McKEE ca 1811 in SC. The families then moved to Missouri in 1817 along with some WILSON’s.

Would like to know Samuel’s ancestors back to Scotland.

Re: Samuel Milton McKAY, Sr, Connections

Posted by: Gary mckay     Date: January 23, 1999 at 06:25:32

In Reply to: Samuel Milton McKAY, Sr, Connections by Lynn McKay of 2226

Mackay/McKays in S. Carolina:  Per Samuel McKay, the only Mackays which were “on the wrong side” in the Bonnie Prince Charlie Uprising of 1745 were a minor sept (or sub-clan) of the MacDonalds of the Western Isles, known to history as the “Lords of the Isles” (today known as the Hebrides..). Per Ireland, the few Mackay that went there were in the early 1600s and late 1600s to put down the “early” Irish troubles and were ardently Protestant. (thus, the old saying in Ireland–the Mackay are real barn-burners…but largely fictional as the Mackay regiments were quite well disciplined…)  I suspect that the more plausible roots of your line lie with a very little researched group of Scots whom arrived in Charleston in 1680s, or the later 1730s group, which later moved to Darien, Ga. as the famous military outpost–a museum is there today.

I am descended directly from those Mackay (Maj. Hugh–ggggggggranfather, uncles James and Patrick)

 

 

More About Samuel Milton McKay:

Burial: Texas

Children of Mary McKee and Samuel McKay are:

2                 i.    Rev. William Ruen29 McKay, born November 19, 1817 in Jefferson County, Missouri; died November 21, 1902 in Jefferson County, Missouri.  He married (1) Adeline Wilson in Jefferson County, Missouri; born January 03, 1823 in Missouri; died Abt. 1890 in Jefferson County, Missouri.  He married (2) Teresa Portney November 06, 1892 in Jefferson County, Missouri.

 

Notes for Rev. William Ruen McKay:

From Wayne Adams

 

sources: marriage records, 1870-80C, Wideman Fam.History (info.fm.Fern HUNT)

He was a pioneer Baptist preacher.

He brought four of his deceased brother’s children back from TX ca.1859 and they may be mixed up with his own among the

children picked up from census records.

 

Sandra McKee checked records of marriages he performed

(Baptist MG) and assumes the Texas trip occurred during the gap  between Dec 1858 and Aug

1859 ceremonies he conducted in MO.

..William also helped raise at least three Wilson children linking to one of his wife’s cousins xref

John & Clarissa Wideman Wilson…”Finding the children in Jefferson Co HH#110 with William

McKay on the 1850C leads to a conclusion that both John & Clarissa died between 1846 and

1850 (no dates on shared material).  Two John Wilson’s were in household #109 and the first

one (a35 – SC) could possibly be the father (remarried) but this seems unlikely.  The wife

(Adaline – a30 MO) may have had one or two children by prior marriage (Jn. Cappow a13 MO &

Margaret Lee a8 MO) mentioned before the second John Wilson (Jn F a20 MO).  I am grouping

the John F & the three children with William McKay as “maybe” siblings”

Lee Family History:   “Adaline, eldest daughter of Jacob Wilson was united in marriage to

William McKay son of Samuel McKay about 1839.  After their marriage they settled about 1-1/2

miles SW of her father where Uncle Billy cleared a farm and lived there until 1875/6.  A Mrs. Fiel

lived there in 1937”

Billy entered the ministry as a Baptist preacher in early life and preached regularly for 50 years..

recognized as one of the best Bible scholars of his time..served as pastor to practically every

Baptist church in Jefferson Co plus some in Franklin, Washington & St Francois Co..monthly

trips on horseback to old 3 Rivers Church in St Francois Co 35-40 miles from Grubville; after

riding home from 4 church monthly circuit had to farm Monday morning to Friday. Raised many

homeless children.   Due to ministry demands on his time could not operate farm successfully;

had to sell it in 1875/6 and leave his home… lived different places for a few years until about

1880-85 when he built a house on a farm on Big River just above the mouth of Old Ditch Creek

belonging to his son-in-law Frank Wideman  Lived there until the death of Adaline about 1890.

About 1892 he remarried to a Mrs Partney of near Hillsboro.  Moved to her farm where he lived

until his death in 1901.  He and Adeline buried at Bethlehem Cemetery.

..The rest of William McKay’s 1850 household:

William McKay  35 MO

Adaline               27 MO (2 adjacent “Sweet Adaline” spouses)

Margaret             10 MO

Sarah E                4 MO

Michael S            2 MO

the 3 Wilson’s mentioned above plus hired hand? Wm Hannihan 25 Ireland

..Valle Twp HH#128 on 1880C

William McKay  63 MO SC SC Farmer

Adaline               54 MO SC MO wife

Emaline              33 MO SC MO dau

James                20 MO MO MO son

Jacob H(?)        16 MO MO MO son

Amanda Guley  24 MO MO MO dau (she m/Wm. Guley 4/24/1873)

Silas Guley         6  MO MO MO “son” (grandson)

Adaline               4  MO MO MO “dau” (granddaughter)

Catharine           2  MO MO MO “dau” (granddaughter)

 

 

 

HISTORY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, MISSOURI AND HISTORY OF THE LEE FAMILY

by Mr. Charles Oliver Lee

 

Adaline, eldest daughter of Jacob Wilson was united in marriage to William McKay, son of Samuel McKay, about 1839. After their marriage they settled about 1-1/2 miles southwest of her father where Uncle Billy cleared a farm and lived until 1875 or 76. Mrs. Fiel owns the farm at present [1937]. The old house stood on the same site as what was called the “Red House”. On this farm Uncle Billy and Aunt Adeline reared their family and spent most of their married lives, which, like all pioneer fathers and mothers was one of toil and sacrifice. Uncle Billy entered the ministry, as a Baptist preacher in early life and preached regularly for 50 years. Although he had little opportunity to go to school, he had a wonderful mind and by reading and study at home, he educated himself until he was recognized as one of the best Bible scholars of his time and community and a preacher second to none. He served as pastor to practically every Baptist church in Jefferson County as well as some in Franklin, Washington and St. Francois County. He made monthly trips on horseback to the old Three Rivers Church in St. Francois County which is 35 or 40 miles from Grubville, and it was not uncommon for him too pastorate churches 10 to 15 miles from home. At that time Baptist churches had a Saturday evening service at which time they conducted the business of the church and had a sermon also. The pastor was supposed to be there for Saturday evening services and seldom failed to do so. They also had services on Saturday night, Sunday and Sunday night, and the preacher had to ride home after Sunday night services or stay all night with some of the members and go home Monday morning. He usually went Sunday night so he could start work on the farm Monday morning. Besides preaching for four churches monthly, Uncle Billy was called far and near to preach funerals, perform marriage ceremonies, and visit the sick. It is probable he preached more funerals and married more couples than any other minister of his day in the county.

 

The life of the pioneer minister was indeed a hard one, and for all his sacrifice and hardships he received a mere pittance. Since his work as a minister demanded so much of his time he could not operate his farm successfully, and he became indebted to such an extent that he had to sell his farm about 1875 or 76, and leave the home that had been his so long. The place where he took Aunt Adaline as a bride, the place that had been home, not only to them and their children, but to the homeless from every quarter. It was to this home that the people of the community, who were in trouble, went to Uncle Billy for advice and consolation. In this home many homeless children found a temporary refuge. It was at this home, the men of this community who went to California in 1849, met and had religious services before starting.

 

In 1858 or 59, Samuel McKay, Uncle Billy’s brother, died in Texas leaving several children. Uncle Billy drove to Texas and brought the children back to Missouri where he and his brother Michael, cared for them until they were able to care for themselves. After leaving the old home, Uncle Billy lived at different places for a few years. About 1880 to 1885 he built a house on a farm belonging to his son-in-law, Frank Wideman. This farm was on Big River just above the mouth of Old Ditch Creek. Here they lived until Aunt Adaline’s death about 1890. About 1892, Uncle Billy married a Mrs. Partney of near Hillsboro, and moved to her farm where he lived until his death in 1901 at the age of 85 years. He and his first wife were buried at the Bethlehem Cemetery.

 

The writer attended a revival service at the Ware Church shortly before Uncle Billy’s death. He was present that night. On being invited to make a few remarks he tottered to the pulpit and spoke very briefly. In concluding, he stated that he had preached the Gospel for over fifty years in Jefferson and surrounding counties, and that he was happy to be able to stand before those present and testify that there is reality in the religion of the Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. He read Second Timothy 4:7-8:

 

 

“I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith. Henceforth, there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge shall give me that day, and not to me only but unto all them also that love his appearing”.

To Uncle Billy and Aunt Adaline the following children were born: Margaret 1840, Michael Silas about 1844, Amanda about 1847, Jane about 1850, Mary about 1854, Jim about 1859, and Jake 1863. They reared Aunt Adaline’s baby sister, Winnie, taking her at the age of six months at the death of her mother in 1845.

 

 

 

1850 Census Jefferson County, Missouri

District 42

House 110

William McKay 35 male white farmer born Mo.

Adaline 27 female white born Mo.

Margaret 10 female white born Mo.

Sarah E. 4 female white born Mo.

Michael S. 2 male white born Mo.

Wilson, Milly Ann 13 female white born Mo.

Wilson, Winney E. 4 female white born Mo.

Wilson, Catharine 7 female white born Mo.

Hannihan, William 25 male white teacher born Ireland

 

 

1870 Census Big River Twp. Jefferson County, Missouri

House 294 Family 297

McKay, William age 52 male white owns sawmill real 5000 personal 660 born Mo.

Adaline age 48 female white kps. house born Mo.

Mary age 18 female white no occupation born Mo.

Amanda age 16 female white no occupation born Mo.

Eliza age 13 female white at home born Mo.

James age 10 male white at home born Mo.

William age 7 male white at home born Mo.

Short, James age 21 male white works in sawmill born Mo.

Boen, Christopher age 18 male white woodchopper born Mo.

 

 

More About Rev. William Ruen McKay:

Burial: November 1902, Bethlehem Cemetery, Jefferson County, Missouri

Occupation: Minister–Baptist Preacher

 

Notes for Adeline Wilson:

..CO Lee Family History includes precise birth dates for Adaline and other children of Jacob &

Annie Couch Wilson.  “Adaline, eldest daughter of Jacob Wilson was united in marriage to

William McKay son of Samuel McKay about 1839.  After their marriage they settled about 1-1/2

miles SW of her father where Uncle Billy cleared a farm and lived there until 1875/6.  A Mrs. Fiel

lived there in 1937”.  xref William McKay notes

 

 

3                ii.    Samuel Milton McKay, born Abt. 1819 in Morse Hill, Jefferson County, Missouri; died Bef. 1859 in Grayson County, Texas.  He married Malinda Pierce October 26, 1845 in Jefferson County, Missouri; born Bef. 1830 in Illinois; died Bet. 1852 – 1860 in Grayson County, Texas.

 

Notes for Samuel Milton McKay:

From Wayne Adams

 

Source-“West Side Stories” article.

Sam Jr. and his wife died during the 1850s leaving four children [brought back to MO by their Uncle Billie].

Samuel headed household #155 on 1850C for Grayson Co, TX next to his sister and mother/stepmother.  Along with Malinda and their three children the household also included Wash Purce 57 SC w/Alfred & M. Purce; Mar y Strickland and her dau Margaret..Isabella McKay Pierce was still in TX on 1860C but didn’t find Malinda  or the McKay children then – tends to confirm West Side Stories research.

 

 

 

..Sources=CO Lee family history & “West Side Stories” article.  Sam Jr. and his wife died during

the1850s leaving four children [brought back to MO by their Uncle Billie].

..Sam’l headed household #155 on 1850C for Grayson Co, TX next to his sister and mother/

stepmother.  Along with Malinda and their three children the hh also included Wash “Purce” 57

SC w/Alfred & M. Purce; Mary Strickland and her dau Margaret..Isabella McKay Pierce was still

in TX on 1860C but didn’t find Malinda  or the McKay children then – tends to confirm COL

narrative.

..Source also =Lynne McKay research notes including census records, marriage , Lee family

history –3 McKay siblings married 3 Pierce siblings.  Brothers Wm.R & Michael S. raised his

orphaned children.

 

 

More About Samuel Milton McKay:

Burial: Pilot Point, Denton, Texas

 

Notes for Malinda Pierce:

 

In History of the Lee Family, C.O. Lee cites tradition that after the Samuel Sr skillet incident “The

other members of the family continued on to their destination.  The son, Samuel Jr, and wife

died in a few years leaving four children.”

 

 

More About Malinda Pierce:

Burial: Pilot Point, Denton, Texas

 

4               iii.    Michael Silas McKay, born November 01, 1821 in Jefferson County, Missouri; died March 20, 1896 in Oermann, Jefferson County, Missouri.  He married Elizabeth “Betty” C. Wilson; born December 08, 1824 in Tennessee; died January 23, 1894 in Oermann, Jefferson County, Missouri.

 

Notes for Michael Silas McKay:

From Wayne McKee

 

Great grandfather of Gladys Lee CASTLEBURY who wrote the “West Side” article.

 

HISTORY OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, MISSOURI AND HISTORY OF THE LEE FAMILY

by Mr. Charles Oliver Lee

 

In 1847, Michael McKay (born 1821) was united in marriage to Elizabeth Wilson (born 1824), daughter of Ephraim and Fannie (nee Link) Wilson, and settled a short distance below Mrs. McKay’s father on Jones Creek. Here they reared their family and spent the remainder of their lives. Two sons and four daughters were born to them: Frances 1849, Mary, Sophronia, Martha, Robert 1859, and Price 1862.

 

In an early day, Grandfather owned 320 acres on Jones Creek reaching from Robert Wilson on the west to Grandmother’s Uncle Jake on the east. Up to middle age he was a well to do and prosperous farmer. At this time he had to sell 160 acres to pay a security debt, for his brother, Uncle Billy. What he got for the 160 acres did not pay all the debt and in the late 1890’s he mortgaged the remaining 160 to finish paying the debt.

 

In his old days he had a rather hard time making a living. Mary, “Aunt Sis”, as we always called her never married, and stayed at home with her parents. Grandmother died in 1894. Aunt Sis continued to stay with Grandfather until his death in 1896, after which time she stayed with Uncle Price until his death in 1928. After his death she stayed with his children until her death in 1936.

 

The writer whose home was near them spent many happy days and nights with Grandpa, Grandma, and Aunt Sis. Aunt Sis was a second mother to him and all was well when he was with her. Grandma was always a rather delicate woman, and in her last years she was not able to do much or go visiting or to church much. The last place she went was to see her daughter, Sophronia, who had pneumonia and was not expected to live. She went to her sister’s, Aunt Catherine Frost, nearby to spend the night where she took pneumonia and died in a few days. She was a good neighbor and as long as she was able was always ready to help her children or neighbors in any way she could.

 

Grandpa was the horse doctor of the community, and went far and near to doctor stock. It is doubtful if he got 5 cents an hour for his services. He was also a good judge of human ailments and went far and near to nurse and doctor the sick. People seeming to feel better if Uncle Mike was there. He was a kind hearted and sympathetic man and was never too busy or too tired to go far or near to aid a sick neighbor. Grandpa and Grandma were faithful members of the Bethlehem Church and regular attendants as long as they were able to go. They had many virtues, few faults. They were buried at Bethlehem Cemetery.

 

 

 

Grandfather of Charles Oliver Lee whose 1930s  research notes were later incorporated into

the “History of the Lee Family”. Michael was the great grandfather of Gladys Lee CASTLEBURY

who wrote the much quoted “West Side” newspaper article.

..C.O.L.  wrote “In an early day, Grandfather owned 320 acres on Jones Creek reaching from

Robert Wilson on the west to Grandmother’s Uncle Jake (Wilson) on the east.  Up to middle age

he was a well to do and prosperous farmer.  At this time he had to sell 160 acres to pay a

security debt for his brother, Uncle Billy.  What he got for the 160 acres did not pay all the debt

and in the late 1890s he mortgaged the remaining 160 to finish paying the debt.  In his old days

he had a rather hard time making a living”…”Grandpa was the horse doctor of the community

and went far and near to doctor stock.  It is doubtful if he got 5 cents an hour for his services.  He

was also a good judge of human ailments and went far and near to nurse and doctor the sick…

He was a kind hearted and sympathetic man..Grandpa and Grandma were faithful members of

the Bethlehem Church and regular attendants as long as they were able to go.  They had many

virtues, few faults.  They are buried at Bethlehem Cemetery.  C.O. “spent many happy days and

nights with Granpa, Grandma and Aunt Sis” and his notes recorded many of the traditions and

observations gleaned from this experience.

..HH#375 of Big River Township on 1880C next to Seth W. McKee

Michael McKay     58 MO SC SC Farmer

Elisabeth               56 TN  SC  SC Wife

Mary S                   27 MO MO TN  Daughter

William                  21 MO MO TN  Son

John T                   18 MO MO TN  Son

Mary Prewitt          —  MO MO MO Help

..Bethlehem Cemetery tombstones appar. now hard to read. JeffCo website cemetery listing

shows Michael McKay Nov 1, 1821 – May 20, 1891 and shows William Robert 1869 (rather than

1859) – 11/2/1938,  I’m assuming descendent copying earlier & more accurate but I am

accepting the mo/day of birth since confirmed that he is buried there..

 

 

 

1880 Census          Big River Township                                Jefferson County, Missouri                    living next door to his uncle, Seth W. McKee

McKay, Michael    58                            Farmer

Elizabeth                                56

Mary S                   27

William                  21

John P                    18                            works on farm

Prewitt, Mary         14                            Domestic Servant

 

 

 

1850 Census Jefferson County, Missouri

District 42

House 123

Michael McKay 28 male white farmer real 200 born Mo.

Elizabeth C. 24 female white farmer born Mo.

Margaret F. 1 female white born Mo.

 

1870 census Big River Twp. Jefferson County, Missouri

House 286 Family 289

McKay, Michael age 48 male white farmer real 1800 personal 840 born Missouri

Elizabeth age 45 female white kps. house born Tennessee

Mary age 19 female white no occupation born Missoouri

Sophonia age 16 female white no occupation born Mo.

Martha age 14 female white no occupation born Mo.

William age 11 male white works on farm born Mo.

Price age 8 male white stays home born Mo.

Lee, Edward 22 male white works on farm born Mo.

 

 

More About Michael Silas McKay:

Burial: March 1896, Bethlehem Cemetery, Grubville, Jefferson County, Missouri

 

Notes for Elizabeth “Betty” C. Wilson:

From Wayne McKee

 

On 1870-80 Census; maiden name from Wideman family history.

 

 

 

 

..On 1870-80C.  According to grandson C.O. Lee “Grandma was always a rather delicate

woman and in her last years she was not able to do much or go visiting or to church much.  The

last place she went was to see her daughter Sophronia who had pneumonia and was not

expected to live.  She went to her sister’s, Aunt Catherine Frost, nearby to spend the night where

she took pneumonia and died in a few days.

..COL also included a chapter on his maternal greatgrandparents Ephraim & Fannie (Link)

Wilson.  It  didn’t specifically mention Betty’s Tennessee birthplace (derived from census

information) but tells us that Ephraim came to Jefferson Co in 1820, settling on Jones Creek,

stayed there “a few years”, then moved to McNary Co, TN where Robert was born in 1828.  The

Wilson’s returned to Jefferson Co after staying “three or four years in Tennessee.”  The

Wideman Family History also contains some information on the Wilsons.

..JeffCo cemetery website shows Elizabeth wife of Michael with the right death date but gives

birth as Dec 8, 1844 rather than 1824.  That does not appear possible unless there were two

Elizabeth’s.  As with Michael I will use the month & day of birth entries from the transcript but ???

 

 

More About Elizabeth “Betty” C. Wilson:

Burial: January 1894, Bethlehem Cemetery, Grubville, Jefferson County, Missouri

 

5               iv.    Isabella Mariah McKay, born Abt. 1826 in Morse Mill, Jefferson County, Missouri; died May 10, 1873 in Missouri.  She married Nathan Priest Pierce; born Abt. 1821 in Tennessee; died in Grayson County, Texas.

 

Notes for Isabella Mariah McKay:

From Wayne Adams

 

Sources- “West Side” article & group sheet by Fern HUNT.

They went to TX about 1850 & returned to MO in 1858 or 1859.  (Actually would have been after 1860 as Isabella Pierce Age 34, MO headed household #596 of Grason Co, TX.  Margaret McKay, age 62 in same household, as well as 4 of Isabella’s children)

She was a “Domestic” owning real property valued @ $1200 & $565 pers.prop. Names of children from census & Betty Harman notes.  Son “W” must have died prior to 1860C unless he left home as a teenager..

Estate admin. 20 Jun 1874 per Fern HUNT

 

 

 

sources=Lynn McKay data, Betty Harmon notes,  “West Side” article, gp.sheet by Fern HUNT.

They went to TX ca.1850 & returned to MO in 1858 or 1859.  (Actually would have been after

1860 as Isabella Pierce Age 34, MO headed household #596 of Grason Co, TX.  Margaret

McKay, age 62 in same household, as well as 4 of Isabella’s children) She was a “Domestic”

owning real property valued @ $1200 & $565 pers.prop. Names of children from census & Betty

Harman notes.  Son “W” must have died prior to 1860C unless he left home as a teenager

..On 1850C HH#156 of Grayson Co, TX next to Saml McKay Jr

1850                                               1860

N.P. Purce          29 TN

I                            24 MO                I. Pierce          34 MO

W                           7  MO

William                  5  MO               William            15 MO

M.                          3 TX                  Malinda           12 TX

Margaret McKay 53 SC                Marg. McKay  62 SC

William Purce      21 IL

Nathan M          9 TX

Thomas M         3 TX

..Lynn’s data includes information from descendent Bill Hunter; also Pierce family research

information from Jack Burns of Boston (I added Isabella’s middle name from his GenForum

posting) and seems to fill in the blanks better than other sources.  The son “W” not accounted

for by the 1860 census was named Wesley.  Wesley & William born in MO 1843-45; Malinda,

Nathan, & Thomas born 1848-1857 in TX; Isabella returned to MO sometime after 7/16/1860

following Margaret McKay’s death

..Estate admin. 20 Jun 1874 per Fern HUNT; death prior to 5/10/1873 per Lynn.

..Per descendent Jack Burns Isabell was born in 1828 and died in 1872 (fits prior ranges)

 

 

More About Isabella Mariah McKay:

Burial: May 1873

 

Notes for Nathan Priest Pierce:

..gggf of Jack Burns whose GenForum postings gave precise dob & death, spouse.  Nathan m/

Isabell Mariah McKay (1828-1872).  They had 4 children “maybe more”  – Malinda, Wm, Wesley &

his ggf Nathan Marion.  Oral tradition that some of the family moved to Texas (Graham,

Grayson or Greyson Co) possibly in the Sherman area but later returned to MO “with an elderly

woman named McKay in the group”.  “some of this family lived in Oregon Co, MO” and he

believed they were from TN.

..Nathan was cited in the CO Lee Family History as the source of the Samuel McKay skillet

incident “This information was given the writer by Uncle Seth W. McKee, a half brother of

Samuel McKay’s wife and he said he got it through Nathan Pierce a son-in-law of Mr McKay who

was present when the incident occurred.”

 

 

6                v.    Margaret McKay, born Abt. 1829 in Missouri; died Bef. May 1856.

 

Notes for Margaret McKay:

From Wayne Adams

 

age 21 on 1850C; research by Fern HUNT

 

7               vi.    Mary F. “Polly” McKay, born Abt. 1831 in Jefferson County, Missouri; died Bef. May 1856 in Grayson County, Texas.  She married (1) Unknown Strickland; died in Grayson County, Texas.  She married (2) Wesley “Whestley” Pierce February 25, 1844 in Jefferson County, Missouri; born Bet. 1816 – 1817 in Kentucky.

 

Notes for Mary F. “Polly” McKay:

From Wayne Adams

 

age 19 on 1850C; married a STRICKLAND per Fern HUNT group sheet. This agrees with the 1850C Betty Harman copied listing her and daughter Margaret in household with Samuel McKay Jr.

 

Mary, age 40,  is on the 1870 census in Big River Twp. Jefferson County, Missouri, House 303 Family 306. She is living with the family of William Johnson and is listed as domestic servant.

 

 

 

 

..age 21 on 1850C; research by Fern HUNT

 

 

 

 

.. includes information from Fern Hunt group sheet & 3/14/1984 Betty Harman ltr Nothing known

about her husband other than his surname.  He must have died in or before 1849.  Presumably

Mary never remarried as she continued using the Strickland surname at least through 1880.

.Grayson Co, TX 1850C (HH#155 w/Saml McKay Jr family).

Mary Strickland      19  MO

Margaret                    1  TX

..1860C Grayson Co TX HH#613, next to Isabella Pierce household

Mary Strickland       28  MO

Margaret                  11  TX

..1880C Joachim Twp Jefferson Co, MO – Pg 2, #19 – Mary F. Stricklan listed as mother in law of

James N. Clipper (who m/Margaret Strickland) –

Mary F. Stricklan               A47/ 1833 MO TN TN.

The TN information is inaccurate and age off by a year but undoubtedly it is her. Could represent

confusion of informant re the Pierce’s route through TN.

..History of the Lee Family of Jefferson Co, MO cites oral tradition that “Aunt Polly and the Pierce

family came back to Missouri” after the death of Samuel McKay’s widow in the early 1860s.

 

 

Notes for Wesley “Whestley” Pierce:

..On the 1850C “Westley Pearce” headed HH#1052, two households away from Silas Ballew

HH including Seth W. McKee.

Westley Pearce     33   KY

Margaret                 21  MO

Martha J                    5  MO

George W                 3  MO

Margaret M           4/12 MO

From this we see that Westley stayed in MO at least temporarily when his siblings went to TX.  In

Grayson Co, TX TN Thomas W headed household #157 following NP in #156 and Wash

(residing with Sam & Malinda McKay) in #155.  I am assuming Thomas W was another son born

two years after Wesley.

..Lynn McKay indicated “more information is available on Westley’s family”

 

 

8              vii.    Female McKay, born Bef. 1835 in Jefferson County, Missouri.

 

Notes for Female McKay:

From Wayne McKee

 

Daughter listed on 1840 Census.

 

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