Rebecca McKee Hildebrand

Descendants of Rebecca McKee

Generation No. 1

        1.  Rebecca28 McKee  (Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born Abt. 1806 in Abbeville County, South Carolina, and died June 14, 1869 in St. Louis, Missouri.  She married George Hildebrand 1828 in Jefferson County, Missouri, son of David Hildebrand and Mary House.  He was born Abt. 1806 in Jefferson County, Missouri, and died August 30, 1850 in Flat River, St. Francois, Missouri.

 

Notes for Rebecca McKee:

From Wayne Adams

 

Rebecca, Sam & family were in household #351 of St. Francois Co, MO (Marion Township) on the 1850 census.

Their son Samuel (sometimes called Outlaw Sam) had a reputation within the Missouri Ozarks during the Civil War second only to the James brothers and his extremely frank memoirs made quite a sensation.  (census & relationship to Sam info from Betty Harman research)

 

Their son Samuel (sometimes called Outlaw Sam) had a reputation within the

Missouri Ozarks during the Civil War second only to the James brothers and his extremely frank

memoirs made quite a sensation.  (census & relationship to Sam info from Betty Harman

research; additional information from Sam’s book and from Sandra McKee)

Three of their sons were murdered.  Frank was hung for horse stealing.  Washington was

taken from the St. Joseph Lead Mines and “shot so full of lead” that he and Stanish Landusky ”

were almost cut in half”.  Henry, the youngest son, at age 13 was ordered to leave the family

home and as he rode away he was shot in the back.  Between the deaths of Washington and

Henry, Rebecca was forced to leave her home with only her family bible and her bed.

 

 

 

REBECCA McKEE married GEORGE HILDERBRAND according to research by Linda GOODELL.  REBECCA would have been the daughter under age 10 shown on the 1810 census for MICHAEL, Sr’s household.  GEORGE was one of the seven HILDEBRAND/HELDEBRAND households in Jefferson County on the 1830 census, which shows (pg 117, line 6) that he and his wife were both born 1800-1810 and had two sons born 1825-1830.  George and Rebecca were enumerated in Marion Township of St. Francois County (created out of Jefferson, Ste. Genevieve and Washington Counties in 1921) on the 1840 census so apparantly moved from Jefferson County during the 1830s.

HILDERBRAND information shared with me by Betty Clark (a “researching cousin” from my Vinyard line) included group sheets reflecting that PETER HILDEBRAND (1754-1784) came to MO from Monongahela Co, PA by 1780.  He died in Byrnesville in “Upper Louisiana and at least four of his sons – ISAAC, DAVID, ABRAHAM & JONATHAN – also came to what became St Charles, St. Louis & Jefferson Counties.  The later three were all residing in Jefferson County during the 1830 census.  DAVID (ancester of Betty’s husband) died in House Springs 4 Jan 1834.  An old family listing tells us (by omission) that GEORGE was not a son by DAVID’s second marriage (His first wife BETSY nee HOUSE died at House Springs in 1807) but he could have been a son by the first marriage or the son of brothers ABRAHAM or JONATHAN.

 

One of George & Rebecca’s sons was SAMUEL HILDEBRAND, who became famous or infamous (depending upon your loyalties) as a “bushwhacker” during the Civil War.  His published memoirs mention “Uncle Harvey McKEE”.  Adam Harvey McKee (brother of Michael McKee Sr) was Rebecca’s uncle so would have been Sam’s great-uncle.  Betty Harman has much more information on this family.

 

 

More About Rebecca McKee:

Burial: June 1869

 

Notes for George Hildebrand:

Sam Hildebrand wrote in his autobiography that the Federals burnt his mother’s house to the ground and yet there is a picture of the house still standing. This puzzled me until I found a copy of a newspaper article from  1917  on the St. Francios County webiste. I have copied the story below. Apparently the house was badly damaged but restored later.

 

 

 

HILDEBRAND HOME NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Historic Old Home Made into Resort

By: Merrill S. McCarty

6 May 1917

 

The Bonne Terre correspondent of The News enjoyed a delightful trip to the old Hildebrand home near Bonne Terrre Tuesday afternoon and was greatly impressed with the beauty of this historic spot and the education which it brings to those who now desire to visit it. Being unaware that our city had so near it such a beautiful resort, I was surprised when I ended my journey and proud that we have so near us this beautiful park.

 

Almost every man, woman and child in St. Francois County has heard of Sam Hildebrand, has been told thrilling stories of his life, etc., but I feel sure that but few have learned of the recent opening of the Hildebrand-Chalet, which is located on Big River, two miles north of Bonne Terre on Highway No. 61.  The old rock home, which was greatly damaged by fire years ago, has been equipped with historic and antique furniture, provided with table, dishes, etc., and one may now go there and entertain or be entertained.  A charming hostess will greet you and devote her time imparting to you her knowledge of the numerous antiques and beautiful objects that are in the spacious dining room, and will also serve you refreshments, or a delicious meal if you desire.  This room contains many articles of interest, among them a Turkish Tea-wood wine compartment case, which has been in St. Francois and Ste. Genevieve counties 200 years.  It was brought to Ste. Genevieve when the first white man landed there by Trope Ricard and came from Ste. Trope, France.  It came later to his daughter Mrs. Hagan, and then to her daughter, Mrs. Tullock, to her daughter, Mrs. McCarty, and then to her son, Merril S. McCarty, the present owner.  It contains four handmade bottles (now valued at $100,000 each.)  It is very much on the order of an old time trunk.  It has been loaned to the Missouri Historic Society for the past ten years and Mr. McCarty just recently had it returned to him.  There are also a number of hand carved chairs, all copies of period chairs, which were made in Florence, Italy.  In the collection of furniture is a Louis Fourteenth table which is more than 200 years old, and a pie crust settee of rosewood, both of which are very valuable.  Near the entrance is a mahogany “Secretaire, which was made in Paris for Attorney General Bates.  In this desk are three volumes of the life of Hildebrand, which the guests may read, but which cannot be taken from the house.  There are only a handful of these books in circulation today and they are worth $15.00 each.  It is at this desk that the guests register.

 

While the above named articles and many more are to be seen in the dining room, not all of the interesting things of this resort are there.  Mr. McCarty has had erected on the beautiful hill several log cabins.  Some of these are furnished with period furniture and may be rented by the day for $1.00.  In this picturesque mountain park one may swim, fish, enjoy a basket picnic or a party of your own planning.  At the foot of the hill, at the entrance, is a rustic cabin which will be converted into a store which will be open on Sunday and on holidays.  Those not desiring to eat in the dining room of the old stone house may buy sandwiches, drinks, etc., at this cabin.

 

The old cabin which the neighbors built for Mrs. Hilderbrand after the fire is still standing and Mr. McCarty has furnished it just as such a place should be furnished.  It contains two rooms and an attic.  In the front room is a fireplace and near it are two spinning wheels which are very old and which carrry with them a real history.  There is in this room a four-poster bed which was in the family of Edgar Allen Poe and many other things of interest.  All of the Hildebrand relics of today are owned by Mr. McCarty and are on exhibit at the Chalet, but many of the antiques and much of the furniture there has fallen to him as heirlooms or has been purchased by him in foreign countries at a great price, many of them so valuable and rare that money could not purchase them.

 

A cover charge of fifty cents for adults entitles one to view these relics and to the use of the grounds all day if desired.  Clubs or churches may have their parties and picnics there for a small charge.  The resort is strictly a high-class, respectable one and Mr. McCarty intends to see that it remains such at all times.  All are invited to visit it and to bring your friends to enjoy it with you.  The hostess will make you feel at home and serve you in a courteous manner.

 

 

 

DEATH: From probate record (Farmington) via Sandra McKee: a surgeon from St Louis came to

operate on George.  George either died from the surgery or perhaps before the surgery.  The

probate file contained a bill for the coffin plus lining materials.

 

 

More About George Hildebrand:

Burial: September 1850

Land Records: on file

Children of Rebecca McKee and George Hildebrand are:

2                 i.    Richard J.29 Hildebrand, born 1830; died 1860.

 

More About Richard J. Hildebrand:

Burial: 1860

 

3                ii.    George Washington Hildebrand, born 1832; died July 06, 1862 in St. Joseph Lead Mines by Big River Mills.

 

Notes for George Washington Hildebrand:

From Wanda Frazer

 

In the words of Samuel Hildebrand, brother of George Washington Hildebrand:

 

“Washington took no part in the war, either directly or indirectly.  Never, pehaps, was there a more peaceable, quiet and law-abiding citizen than he was;  he never spoke a word that could be constured into a sympathy for the Southern cause, and I defy any man to produce the least evidence against his loyalty, either in word or act.  While the war was raging, he paid no attention to it whatever, but was busily engaged in lead mining n the St. Joseph Lead Mines, three mines from Big River Mills, and about six miles from the old homestead.  In partnership with him was a young man by the name of Landsuky, a kind, industrious, inoffensive man, whose loyalty had never been doubted.  My sister, Mary, was his affianced bride, but her death prevented the marriage.”

 

On the 6th day of July, 1862, while my brother Washington and Mr. Landusky were working in a drift underground, Captain Flanche and his company of calvalry called a halt at the mine, and ordered them to come up; which they did immediately.  No questions were asked of them, and no explanations were given.  Flanche merely ordered them to walk off a few steps toward a tree, which they did; he then gave the work “Fire” and the whole company fired at them, literally tearing them to pieces!  I would ask the enlightened world if there ever was commited a more diabolical deed?  If, in all the annals of cruely, or int he world’s wide history, a murder more cold-blooded and cruel could be found?

 

A citizen who happened to be present ventured to ask in astonishment why this was done, to which Flanche merely replied, as he rode off, “they bees the friends of Sam Hildebrand!”

 

 

 

 

More About George Washington Hildebrand:

Burial: July 1862

 

+      4               iii.    Elvira Hildebrand, born 1834; died May 02, 1916 in Ware, Missouri.

+      5               iv.    Samuel S. Hildebrand, born January 06, 1836 in Big River Flat, St. Grancois, Missouri; died May 1872 in May, Pickneyville, Illinois.

6                v.    William M. Hildebrand, born 1838.

7               vi.    James Frank Hildebrand, born 1842; died November 20, 1861.

 

Notes for James Frank Hildebrand:

From Wanda Frazer

 

Frank and his brother, Sam, were accused of stealing ahorse from Firman McIlvaine, Sam swore that he and Frank didn’t steal Firman’s fine mare.

After Sam Hildebrand had safely moved his family to the vicinity of Flat Woods, his brother, Frank, stayed on in his place of concealment until the middle of November.

Frank carefully made his way into Big River Mills one night to consult Judge Franklin Murphy.  The Judge recommended that Frank go to Potosi and prove his loyalty to the Union by enlisting in the Home Guards of that place.  Captain Castleman was the enlisting officer of the Home Guards at Potosi and upon presenting himself before the Captain, Frank was told to wait there and was given a place in the Guard House to sleep that night.

Castleman immediately sent word to Firman McIlvaine that he had one of the Hildebrads for him.  McIlvaine lost no time in sending for Frank and took him before Judge Franklin Murphy at Big River Mills. Murphy told the Vigilantes that the only thing he could do was to hear their charges against Frank and in do time the trial would be held, when Frank would be condemned or freed on the evidence that might be produced.  This dissatisfied the Vigilantes and they said that Frank had stolen a horse in St. Genevieve County, and that they would take him to Judge R. M. Cole at Punjaub.  Judge Cole told them essentially the same thing that Judge Murphy had told them and they said that the charge against Frank was stealing a mule in Jefferson County and that they would take him there.

Not finding a Justice of the Peace who would give them a prompt death warrant for Frank, they took him several miles from Punjaub and hung him to a tree without any kind of trial and with no specific charges being filed in any legal court.  Frank’s body was thrown into a nearby sink-hole where it lay for more than a month before friends found it and gave it a more decent burial.

The murder of Frank Hildebrand took place on November 20th, 1861.

 

 

 

More About James Frank Hildebrand:

Burial: December 1861

 

8              vii.    Mary Ann Hildebrand, born 1844; died Bef. 1862.

 

Notes for Mary Ann Hildebrand:

biography of Sam Hildebrand, says she had died before the start of the Civil War.  She was engaged to a man named Landusky

 

9             viii.    James Hildebrand, born 1845.

10             ix.    Henry Hildebrand, born 1847; died July 23, 1862 in Hildebrand Homestead.

 

Notes for Henry Hildebrand:

From Wanda Frazer

 

In the words of Samuel Hildebrand, Henry’s brother:

 

“My brother, Henry, was a mere boy, only thirteen years of age.  Of course he was too young to have any political principles; he was never accused of being a Rebel;  no accusation of any kind had ever been made against him;  he was peaceable and quiet, and like a good boy, he was living with his mother, and doing the best he could toward supporting her.  True, he was very young to have the charge of suce a farm, but he was a remarkable boy.  Turning a deaf ear to all the rumors and excitements around him, he industriously applied himself to the accomplishment of one object, taht of taking care of his mother.

 

On the 23rd of July, 1862, Captain Adolph and his company with an intermixture of the Vigilance mob, went to my mother’s house for the purpose of burning it up.  The house was two stores high, built of nice cut stone, and all finished within, making it altogether one of the best houses in the county.

 

The soldiers proceeded to break down the picket fence, and to pitch it into the house for kindling.  The refused to let anything be taken out of the house, being determined to burn up the furniture, clothing, bedding, provisions, and everything else connected with it.

 

My, little brother Henry, and an orphan boy, about fourteen years of age, whom my mother had hired to assist Henry in cultivation of the farm, were present at the conflagration and stook looking on in mute astonishment.  Esroger ordered brother Henry to leave, but whether he knew it was their intention to shoot him after getting him a short distance from the house, as was their custom, it is impossible for me to say.  Probably feeling an inward consciousness of never having committed an act to which they would persist in making him go; so he remained and silently gazed at the fire.

 

When ordered again to leave, he seemed to be stupefied with wonder at the enormity of the scene before him.  Franklin Murphy being present told him it was best to leave; so he mounted his horse and started, but before he got two hundred yards from the house, he was shot and he dropped dead from the horse.  Thus perished the poor innocent boy, who could not be induced to believe that the men were base enough to kill him, Innocent and inoffensive as he was.  But alas!  How greatly was he mistaken in them!”

 

 

More About Henry Hildebrand:

Burial: July 1862

 

+      11              x.    Margaret Annie Hildebrand, born October 15, 1848 in Missouri; died December 10, 1925 in Donne Terre, St. Francois County, Missouri.

 

 

Generation No. 2

        4.  Elvira29 Hildebrand (Rebecca28 McKee, Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born 1834, and died May 02, 1916 in Ware, Missouri.  She married James Adams.  He was born 1832 in Kentucky, and died in Ware, Missouri.

 

More About Elvira Hildebrand:

Burial: May 1916, Pilgram Rest Cemetary, Ware, Missouri

 

More About James Adams:

Burial: Pilgram Rest Cemetary, Ware, Missouri

Children of Elvira Hildebrand and James Adams are:

12               i.    Richard30 Adams, born 1850.

+      13              ii.    Rebecca Adams, born 1856.

14             iii.    Mary A. Adams, born 1857.  She married John Boyer; born 1852.

 

Notes for John Boyer:

From Wanda Frazer

 

John Boyer was a farmer that had at least 8 children.

 

 

+      15             iv.    James F. Adams, born 1859; died June 14, 1938 in Ware, Missouri.

 

 

5.  Samuel S.29 Hildebrand (Rebecca28 McKee, Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born January 06, 1836 in Big River Flat, St. Grancois, Missouri, and died May 1872 in May, Pickneyville, Illinois.  He married Margaret Hampton October 30, 1854 in St. Francois, Missouri.  She was born November 20, 1829, and died in Texas.

 

Notes for Samuel S. Hildebrand:

From Wayne Adams

 

Depending upon your loyalties during the Civil War, “Outlaw Sam” Hildebrand

was either a dashing Robin Hood type exterminator of Yankees or a deadly

killer.  He and his men made a number of expeditions through the Missouri

Ozarks wrecking havoc on those he considered to be “the enemy” and his memoirs

raised a lot of interest and controversy.  A reference in the memoirs to Uncle

Harvey McKee probably refers to his wife’s great-uncle, Adam Harvey McKee.

 

 

 

From Wanda Frazer

 

The peculiar situation in Missouri border country where opposing beliefs set neighbor against neighbor in mortal combat, the uncertanities of war, and revised standard of morality were elements which formed an integral part of Sam Hildebrand’s life.

When Sam’s brother, Frank, was accused of horse stealing and was hanged in 1861, Sam killed two of the men responsible and became a fugitive.  He was driven from his home country and his family was made destitute.  He found friends among Southern sympathizers and was given a commission as major in the Confederate army.  Fighting and fleeing throughout months of guerilla warfare, he raided Federal camps and private enemies alike in the name of the cause he believed right.

The character of guerilla fighting in Missouri was vicious even by wartime standards, and after hostilities ceased there was bitterness remaining which led to continued bloodshed in some localities.  At the close of the war Sam Hildebrand continued his depredations, and rewards were offered for him dead or alive.  He pursed by posses and was finally shot and killed in Illinois in 1872.

Two books are in print to my knowledge “The Autobiography of Sam Hildebrand.” and “Sam Hildebrand Rides Again.”

 

 

From Jerry Howe

Household #329 of Jefferson county 1850 census.  The info does not add up according to the dates.

 

Guerrilla Bands in Bollinger

and Ste. Francois Counties of Missouri

The Sam Hildebrand story

 

by Pitter Seabaugh

 

 

When Sam’s brother, Frank, was accused of horse stealing and was hanged in 1861 after turning himself in, Sam killed two of the men responsible and became a fugitive. He was driven from his home town and his family was made destitute. He found friends among the southern sympathizers and was given a commission as major in the Confederate Army. Fighting and fleeing throughout months of guerilla warfare, he raided Federal camps and private enemies alike in the name of the cause he believed right.

 

At the close of the war Sam Hildebrand continued his depredations, and rewards were offered for him dead or alive. He was pursued by many posses and was finally shot and killed in Illinois in 1872.

 

Old George Hildebrand and his wife Rebecca McKee had done a fairly good job of raising their children. Their children were Frank, William ,Washington, Samuel S, Henry and Mary Ann. Sam was born January 6, 1836 on the north side of Big River near Bonne Terre. Sams grandfather, David Hildebrand had settled on Big River about 1802 where he died at the age of one hundred. His son George moved there in 1832. In 1850 George Hildebrand died leaving the farm and home for the boys to manage, which they did with more than ordinary success.

 

In 1861 Sam and his brother Frank was accused of stealing Firman Mcllvaine’s finest mare. Sam swore that he and Frank didn’t steal the mare. Prior to losing his fine mare, Mcllvaine had no trouble with the Hildebrands and they had known each other all their lives. This was a very common practice of the white man at this time. Many American Indians were being falsely charged with theft, for an Indian could not testify against a white man. The white man wanted and needed more land and the

non-reservation Indians had land. Since they were American Indian, the easiest way to get the land was to charge them with false theft charges and charge them fines that they could not pay. Their land was then auctioned off on the courthouse steps to the highest bidder who could pay the fine. This legal land grabbing theft was called the “Old Mule Trick.” A white farmer would just chase one of his mules or horses into the Indians fenced in property. Then he would ride into town and tell the Sheriff the Indian had stolen his livestock.

 

After the Federal forces learned that Sam had killed both Cornicius and Mcllvaine (in retaliation of his brothers death), orders were sent with intentions of taking vengeance on Sam. Concentrating on the Hildebrand homestead, they ordered Sam’s elderly mother to leave the county as they intended to burn the house and barns and destroy all their property. The only thing she could keep was her

family Bible and her bed. She took what she had and moved to the home of her brother, Harvey McKee. On July 6th, 1862 the militia swooped down on the mining camp and opened fire on Sam’s little sister Mary Ann, her fiancé Landusky, and Sam’s brother Washington. Flanches whole company fired their musket balls into these to men, literally tearing them to pieces.

 

On July 10th, Captain Esroger went to the home of John Roan, a fifty five year old uncle of Sam’s. He was taken about a mile from his home and shot to death.

 

On July 23rd, Captain Adolph and another Federal Captain went to the Hilderbrand homestead. They killed Sam’s little thirteen year old brother Henry. Shot him in the back, after telling him he could walk away. Sam watched all of this from a hill top. He decided then and there that he would get the people responsible for the deaths of his family. Sam never killed anyone who was not in the Federal services. Sam never killed a child a women, nor burned the property of even his most bitter enemy. His homestead had been burned and lost forever. The home his grandfather had built.

 

On July 13th, Sam, with two companions James Cab and John Burlap, had some wrongs they wanted to redress and Sam made a pact to help them. He promised that he would give them as much aid as possible. Sam later had more men join him, such as Dick Cowan, Dick Berryman, Captain Bolin, William Cato, Bill Rucker, Jesse Pigg, George Lasiter, Tom Hail, Wash Nabors, James Cato and many more. They became known as there Hildebrand gang. Sam made mention of Dick Cowan being on many of his trips to Bloomfield and that the Rebels had burned his home in early February of 1863. Dick Cowan is buried in the Cowan Cemetery, in Wayne County Missouri.

 

As you will remember from a previous story, it all started with the Ripley County massacre on Christmas day of 1863, when Major Wilson and his troops killed 35 soldiers and 62 civilians.

 

At the Battle of Pilot Knob on September of 1864, Major James Wilson and six of his men were captured then killed by the Confederates.

 

Daniel McGee had led a group in guerrilla warfare against the Union. He became a marked man. On February 4th, 1863 Union soldiers, under the command of Captain K. Leeper, ambushed Daniel McGee and 28 others at the home of Simon Cato. Simon Cato was the son of Lewis Cato and older brother of Tabitha Cato

McGee, who was married to Thomas Jefferson McGee. Carolyn Cato, daughter of

Simon and Rebecca Cato, was married to young Ransom Ladd who was born 1829. All 29 of the Cato and McGees were killed at The Battle of Mingo Swamp. It is said that McGee was shot so many times that his torso was nearly cut in two halves. Now I don’t know how much Sam Hilderbrand had to do with this but, it was reported by Hilderbrand himself that he was in the area on February 4th. He also said that his wife and children were staying at a near by home. Keep in mind his mother was a McKee.

 

Hildebrand reported that “on the 4th day of February, we made a charge on the

Federal camp.” After the battle the wounded were carried to a retreat. Sam went on to say, “we all started for Mingo Swamp. The Federals followed us, and as our

march was retarded by our wounded, the Federals made their way around and charged us. They divided our line, cutting off seven of my men, whom they took prisoners. We started making our way to the St. Francis River when someone from the opposite shore called for us to bring him a horse. From his voice we knew him as William Cato, one of the seven who had been taken as a prisoner. We afterwards heard that the officer in command at Bollinger’s Mill was Capt. Leeper from Ironton, Missouri.”

 

This occurred 14 months before the Fort Pillow massacre on April 12, 1864. Daniel’s brother Hugh was there. Then to top it all off on August 10, 1864, the Union went to the home of Thomas Jefferson McGee, an elderly man of 64 years, murdered him, and hid his corpse. It was not found for two weeks. They also burned his home.

 

Three days later they went to the home of Blair McGee and killed him in the presence of his 12 year old daughter. Finally when Hugh McGee surrendered at

a designated place, he and 6 others were shot down before a firing squad on May 28, 1865. On October 28, 1864 Asa Ladd, son of Ransom Ladd born 1807, was executed in retaliation for the death of Major Wilson.

 

All of this leads me to think that these massacres were not a result of the civil war, but a result of these men, our ancestors, being Cherokee Indians. Too many of these killings were senseless. A note I got from Mike Ladd, in response to Major Wilson, reads: Major Wilson signed an order directing Leeper to take eighty men, dress them in “butternut” clothing, march with them to White River, find out the

intention of the “Rebels” under Shelby, and on returning burn every mill, building, grain stack, and hay rick on the road,” closing mysteriously with the following words underscored: “And you know I don’t like to be troubled with prisoners.” Among other letters were quite a number from the Honorable Charles Drake, United States Senator from Missouri, urging Leeper to do his work thoroughly and well. These letters, along with Wilson’s, are in the hands of ex-Governor Thomas C. Reynolds.

They will, in due time, be presented to the world, with other startling and damaging facts concerning the atrocities perpetrated by Federal soldiers in Missouri.

 

* MO Division of Tourism

* National Archives

* A History of the 15th Missouri Calvary Regiment, CSA

* A History of Stoddard County

* A History of Wayne County

* The Autobiography of Sam Hildebrand

* Sam Hildebrand Rides Again

 

 

 

 

In fifteen days, the gang had ridden back to Missouri, and on Jan. 31,1874, entered the small flag station at Gadshill, MO., a depot along the line of the Iron Mountain Railroad. The bandits, which included Jesse and Frank James, Cole, Jim and Bob Younger, Jim Cummings, Clell and Ed Miller, Sam Hildebrand, Arthur McCory, and Jim Reed, flagged downed the Little Rock Express. As the train came to a stop, the bandits jumped into the baggage car and quickly opened the safe, shooting off its locks. They took from it more than $22,000 in gold and bills. Some of the bandits went through the cars, robbing the passengers. Jesse James then mounted his horse and rode up to the engineer’s cabin where Cole Younger held the engineer under his gun. “Give her a toot, Cole !” Jesse shouted to him. Cole Younger grabbed the whistle cord and yanked on it. As the whistle shrieked, Younger laughed like a small boy with a new toy.

 

 

The following article concerning Sam Hildebrand was published in the

Democrat-Register newspaper of Bonne Terre, St. Francois County,

Missouri,

on June 23, 1905.

 

SAM HILDEBRAND SAID TO HAVE BEEN SEEN IN TEXAS.

VERNON, TEX., June 18 — Sam Hilderbrand (sic), the aged and notorious

outlaw who has been evading officers of the law for forty years, is said

to have called at a store near the crossing of the Red river yesterday.

He was recognized, but he disappeared before officers could be notified.

 

Hilderbrand (sic) and his brother committed many robberies and other

depredations in Missouri, Arkansas and Texas in the 60′s.  Frank

Hilderbrand was captured and hanged.  Sam avenged the death of his

brother

by murdering two of the men who were concerned in his capture.  At the

heard of a band of outlaws he made his rendezvous in Indian Territory and

the wilds of Arkansas, and committed many bloody deeds.

 

It is claimed that the records show that he committed, single-handed,

twenty-seven murders.  He disappeared in 1872, and it was supposed that

he

was dead until a few days ago when he was discovered, it is said, living

on a farm near Lawton, Okla.  His identify was clearly established, and a

warrant sworn out for arrest.  Before it could be served the old man

disappeared.  A description was sent to all of the towns of this section,

and this led to his being recognized yesterday when he called at a store

for provisions —[Globe-Democrat, St. Louis, Missouri].

 

 

 

The following article concerning Sam Hildebrand was published in the

Democrat-Register newspaper of Bonne Terre, Missouri, on July 7, 1905.

 

IS HE DEAD?

The St. Louis papers are devoting a good deal of space as to whether Sam

Hilderbrand (sic) is dead or not and as to whether he is buried in St.

Francois County.  Mr. George Helderbrand, formerly sheriff of Madison

county, has this to say in regard to the same:  “Sam Helderbrand (sic)

was

not killed in Illinois, as reported years ago, and his body is not buried

in St. Francois county, Mo.”

 

Old Man Boyer and Billy Townsend of Madison county, were intimate friends

of his cousin Sam and that about fifteen years ago Billy Townsend moved

to

Arkansas, and after he had been there a few years Old Man Boyer received

a

letter from him saying “Our old friend Preacher Morgan (the name by which

Sam was known to his intimate friends) spent the night with me.  He is in

good health and on his way to Texas.”  Continuing, Mr. Helderbrand said:

 

“The body buried in St. Francois county was never identified as that of

Sam Helderbrand.  His son who was called to St. Francois county to

identify the body, could not do it.  He said it looked like his father in

some respects, and in others it did not, and that was as far as the

identification went.

 

“If Sam Helderbrand (sic) is dead,” said George, “he has died in the last

twelve months, and I don’t think he is dead.” —Fredericktown Dem-News.

 

From: Bettye Warner

==== MOSTFRAN Mailing List ====

St. Francois County MoGenWeb Page:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~mostfran/

 

Sam Hildebrand

January 1836 – March 1872

Sam Hildebrand was one of the most notorious southern guerrilla leaders to operate in the Southeast Missouri Region.  He was born in 1836 in a home that had been built by his father near the Big River in 1832.  Hildebrand’s reign of terror began following the murder of his brother by Union vigilantes in Ste. Genevieve County at the start of the war.  Hildebrand himself was attacked by Union soldiers at his farm in the Flatwoods area of St. Francois County.  The wounded Hildebrand was taken to rebel camp in Greene County, Arkansas where he was commissioned a major by confederate General Jeff Thompson.

 

 

 

When he recovered, Hildebrand returned to the county and killed the two men he believed to be responsible.  In retaliation, Federal troops burned the Hildebrand home and killed his 13 year old brother.  Neighbors built a log cabin near the burned-out-family home for his mother.  Operating from a Confederate base in Arkansas, Hildebrand’s knowledge of the area allowed him to make repeated forays into Southeast Missouri, often returning to the small community of Big River Mills north of Bonne Terre for supplies.  A network of Confederate sympathizers provided Hildebrand and his men shelter and food, allowing them to escape Union traps.

 

 

 

 

 

For several weeks in 1864, Hildebrand and his men commandeered the St. Joe Lead Mines and manufactured lead for General Sterling Price to be used during his invasion of Missouri.  Afterwards Price ordered the furnaces blown up so that they would not fall into federal hands.  The lead was stored near Big River Mills.  While recovering the lead, Hildebrand’s men were attacked by federal troops under Major Samuel Montgomery at Tyler’s Mill at Big River.  According to Montgomery, twenty one confederates were killed.

 

 

 

Hildebrand’s raids earned him a hatred which lasted long after the war ended.  Sam Hildebrand was killed in Pinchneyville, Illinois by a sheriff’s deputy in May of 1872.  He was buried in what is now the Hampton Cemetery in Park Hills, MO.  The grave is marked by a simple stone.  Hildebrand’s brother, William, served in the Union army.

 

 

 

In Park Hills, along old State Route 8, visitors can still view the 164 year old home of Dick Berryman, now a private residence.  One of Hildebrand’s closest friends, Berryman accompanied Hildebrand on several of his deadly raids into Southeast Missouri.  During the war the house served as an underground recruiting center for the Confederate cause.  One of Hildebrand’s many local hideouts, the cave in St. Francois State Park in northern St. Francois County, still bears his name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

..Depending upon your loyalties during the Civil War, “Outlaw Sam” Hildebrand was either a

dashing Robin Hood type exterminator of Yankees or a deadly killer.  He and his men made a

number of expeditions through the Missouri Ozarks wrecking havoc on those he considered to be

“the enemy” and his memoirs raised a lot of interest and controversy.  A reference in the

memoirs to Uncle Harvey McKee probably refers to his wife’s great-uncle, Adam Harvey McKee.

..Household #329 in Jefferson Co, MO 1850C but dates suspect

..from Wanda Frazer notes: The peculiar situation in Missouri border country where opposing

beliefs set neighbor against neighbor in mortal conflict, the uncertainties of war, and revised

standards of morality were elements which formed an integral part of Sam Hildebrand’s lief.

When Sam’s brother, Frank, was accused of horse stealing and was hanged in 1861, Sam killed

two of the men responsible and became a fugitive.  He was driven from his home county and his

family was made destitute.  He found friends among southern sympathizers and was given a

commission as major in the Confederate army.  Fighting and fleeing throughout months of

guerilla warfare, he raided Federal camps and private enemies alike in the name of the cause

he believed right.  The character of guerilla fighting in Missouri was vicious even by wartime

standards and after hostilities ceased there was bitterness remaining which led to continued

bloodshed in some localities.  At the close of the war Sam Hildebrand continued his

depredations and rewards were offered for him dead or alive.  He was pursued by posses and

was finally shot and killed in Illinois in 1872 (see “Autobiography of Sam Hildebrand” and “Sam

Hildebrand Rides Again”.)

 

 

 

 

 

Rebecca McKee moved from Abbeville, SC to Jefferson County, Mo with her parents, Michael and Margaret McKee, and her siblings sometime around 1815-1818.  She would have been around ten years old at that time.

In 1828, Rebecca married George Hildebrand, a German immigrant.  Together the couple had ten children.  Sons: Richard, George Washington, Samuel, William Frank, Henry,and James and Daughters: Elvira, Mary, Margaret.

According to Samuel’s autobiography, they were not educated people and did not attend school.  George Hildebrand, the patriarch of the group, died on August 30, 1850.

As the Civil War near, tensions were on high.  Many immigrants from the south, held Confederate beliefs; while the sixty percent of immigrants in Missouri sided with the Union point of view.  Samuel states in his biography, that he didn’t understand all of the political views nor did he care.  All he knew was what others told him.  This is probably true for a lot of the immigrants of that time period.

By the 1860s, the Hildebrand’s had a reputation  for being wild, bullies and hotheads.  Samuel’s autobiography, states that there were a number of “hot claim” disputes.

Samuel would gain a reputation in the Ozarks that were “second only to the [Jesse] James brothers”.

Around August 1861, Allen Roan {a Hildebrand cousin} was accussed of horse stealing.  He apparently traded the horse with Samuel, who did not realize the horse was stolen.  When Samuel traded the horse, Hildebrand was linked with Roan as a horse stealer.

Federal agents were called in for a trial and death threats were made against them.  Samuel and his brother, Frank {also accussed} hid out in the woods for months.  Samuel finally took his family and moved to a southwestern community called, Flat Woods.  Frank decided to stay and work things out.  Frank was arrested by Firman McIlvaine and some of his friends.  When a judge refused to pass sentence without a trial, McIlvaine and his friends took him out and hung him.

In April 1862, with evidence of where Sam was, McIlvaine and his men ambushed the Sam Hildebrand family.  Sam claimed that this is when he decided to fight back. He would later acquire the nickname “Kill Devil.”

Shortly thereafter, Sam received a commission from Confederate commander General Jeff Thompson.  He was given permission to pick his own troops, fight his own way, as long as he checked in every six months.

Sam then moved to Green County, Arkansas.  He would sneak into Missouri to fight. In mid-June 1862, Sam killed the informat that gave up his location and McIlvaine.   Three companies of union troops were called out in response.  Two of Sam’s brothers, Washington and Henry, and an uncle {John Roan, father of Allen} were killed in retalitaion.

In July 1862, Rebecca McKee Hildebrand, by this time an elderly woman, was forced out of her home.  “Rebecca was forced to leave her home with only her family bible and her bed.”

William Hildebrand was shot when he exited a mine he was working in by Union troops.

On July 23, the troops arrived to find youngest son, Henry working the land.  He was ordered to leave, climbed on his horse and began to ride away. Sam tells in his autobiography: “The soldiers proceeded to break down the picket fence, and to pitch it into the house for kindling.  The refused to let anything be taken out of the house, being determined to burn up the furniture, clothing, bedding, provisions, and everything else connected with it…

 

When ordered again to leave, he seemed to be stupefied with wonder at the enormity of the scene before him.  Franklin Murphy being present told him it was best to leave; so he mounted his horse and started, but before he got two hundred yards from the house, he was shot and he dropped dead from the horse.  Thus perished the poor innocent boy, who could not be induced to believe that the men were base enough to kill him, Innocent and inoffensive as he was.  But alas!  How greatly was he mistaken in them!”

Sam participated in warfare and was termed “guerrilla Hildebrand” through the remainder of the Civil War.  He shot one “friend” for giving his location away.  He often made quick, surprise attacks in areas he knew were not heavily armed.  In that way, he was very cautious.

Union troops continued to search for Sam. He was considered a bushwacker.  His fighting stopped when he was paroled in Jacksonport, Arkansas on May 26, 1865.

Rebecca died on June 14 1869, having outlived at least half of her children.

Sam was shot and killed resisting arrest in May 1872, in Pickneyville, Illinois.

 

More About Samuel S. Hildebrand:

Burial: May 1872, May, Pickneyville, Illinois

 

More About Margaret Hampton:

Burial: Texas

Children of Samuel Hildebrand and Margaret Hampton are:

16               i.    Henry30 Hildebrand.

+      17              ii.    Rebecca Hildebrand, born March 12, 1858 in Washington County, Missouri; died May 03, 1948 in St. Francois County, Missouri.

18             iii.    Mary Elizabeth Hildebrand.

19             iv.    Nancy Hildebrand.

20              v.    Margaret Hildebrand.

21             vi.    George Hildebrand.

 

 

11.  Margaret Annie29 Hildebrand (Rebecca28 McKee, Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born October 15, 1848 in Missouri, and died December 10, 1925 in Donne Terre, St. Francois County, Missouri.  She married William Daniel Harris.

 

Notes for Margaret Annie Hildebrand:

From Wanda Frazer

 

Margaret Ann Hildebrand Harris could not write her name.  She and William had eleven children, nine of whom were still alive in 1900, according to the U.S. Census.  During their 41 years of marriage, William never mentioned his first marriage.  What Margaret learned of that marriage and the death of William’s first wife came from William’s mother, after he died.  Margaret was awarded a widow’s pension {Certificate No. 680819} for $10, [later increased to $30 a month], based on William’s service in the Union Army during the Civil War, April 1908.  She died in Donne Terre, St. Francois County, Missouri, December 10th, 1925, after an 8-day bout with pneumonia brought on by influenza.  She was buried in Buster Cemetery, Bonne Terre.

 

More About Margaret Annie Hildebrand:

Burial: December 1925, Buster Cemetery, Donne Terre, St. Francois County, Missouri

Children of Margaret Hildebrand and William Harris are:

22               i.    William Henry30 Harris.

23              ii.    James M. Harris.

24             iii.    LeRoy Harris.

25             iv.    Benjamin Harris.

26              v.    Cora B. Harris.

27             vi.    David P. Harris.

28            vii.    Florence Harris.

29           viii.    Juanita Harris.

 

 

Generation No. 3

        13.  Rebecca30 Adams (Elvira29 Hildebrand, Rebecca28 McKee, Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born 1856.  She married Unknown Couch.

Children of Rebecca Adams and Unknown Couch are:

30               i.    John31 Couch, born 1874.

31              ii.    Rich Couch, born 1875.

32             iii.    Walter Couch, born 1878.

 

 

15.  James F.30 Adams (Elvira29 Hildebrand, Rebecca28 McKee, Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born 1859, and died June 14, 1938 in Ware, Missouri.  He married Sarah Ann Livereaux May 20, 1885 in Jefferson County, Missouri, daughter of Unknown Livereaux and Missouri Boyer.  She was born 1866, and died in Ware, Missouri.

 

More About James F. Adams:

Burial: June 1938, Ware, Missouri

Occupation: 1889, Farmer

 

More About Sarah Ann Livereaux:

Burial: Ware, Missouri

Children of James Adams and Sarah Livereaux are:

33               i.    Sadie Bell31 Adams, born December 14, 1890 in Jefferson County, Missouri; died December 21, 1948 in St. Louis City Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri.  She married Phillip Albert Bailey in Jefferson County, Missouri; born January 24, 1887; died October 25, 1953 in DeSoto, Jefferson County, Missouri.

 

More About Sadie Bell Adams:

Burial: December 1948, Jefferson County, Missouri

 

More About Phillip Albert Bailey:

Burial: October 1953, Jefferson County, Missouri

 

34              ii.    Lillie Adams, born February 14, 1894; died July 04, 1947 in Ware, Missouri.

 

More About Lillie Adams:

Burial: July 1947, Ware, Missouri

 

35             iii.    Robert Adams, born June 23, 1898; died February 25, 1952 in Ware, Missouri.

 

More About Robert Adams:

Burial: February 1952, Ware Cemetary, Ware, Missouri

Cause of Death (Facts Pg): Nephritis

 

36             iv.    Baby Adams, born 1887.

37              v.    Baby Girl Adams, born May 02, 1889.

 

 

17.  Rebecca30 Hildebrand (Samuel S.29, Rebecca28 McKee, Michael27, Adam26, Archibald25, Archibald24, Thomas23, James22, Robert21 McKie, Thomas20, Andrew19, John18 McGhie, Alexander17, Alexander16 MacKay, Gilbert15 MacKie, Malcom14 MacKay, Gilbert13 M’Kie, Neill12, John11, Iye10, Martin9 MacKay, Iye Hugh8 MacEthj, Hugh7, Malcolm6 MacEth, Hugh or Angus5, Aoidh4 Heth, Malcolm3 III, Duncan2 I, Crinan of1 Dunkeld) was born March 12, 1858 in Washington County, Missouri, and died May 03, 1948 in St. Francois County, Missouri.  She married Joseph Valentine Forshee April 04, 1877 in St. Francois County, Missouri.  He was born April 23, 1849, and died May 11, 1923 in St. Louis County, St. Louis, Missouri.

 

More About Rebecca Hildebrand:

Burial: May 1948

 

More About Joseph Valentine Forshee:

Burial: May 1923

Children of Rebecca Hildebrand and Joseph Forshee are:

38               i.    Walter31 Forshee.

39              ii.    Joseph Racine Forshee, born November 15, 1874; died March 1964.  He married Minnie Snead July 03, 1899 in St. Francois County, Missouri; born April 05, 1882; died November 22, 1972 in St. Louis County, St. Louis, Missouri.

 

More About Joseph Racine Forshee:

Burial: March 1964

 

More About Minnie Snead:

Burial: November 1972

 

40             iii.    Ella Margaret Forshee, born February 19, 1880; died August 29, 1972 in St. Louis County, St. Louis, Missouri.  She married Henry John Barren; born September 04, 1869; died October 15, 1940 in St. Louis County, St. Louis, Missouri.

 

More About Ella Margaret Forshee:

Burial: August 1972

 

More About Henry John Barren:

Burial: October 1940

 

41             iv.    Arizona Belle Forshee, born August 10, 1882 in Silver Springs, Missouri; died July 24, 1964.  She married Daily Peter Dotson April 12, 1899 in St. Francois County, Missouri; born October 29, 1877 in Carroll County, Virginia; died June 11, 1967 in Missouri.

 

More About Arizona Belle Forshee:

Burial: July 1964

 

More About Daily Peter Dotson:

Burial: June 1967

 

42              v.    Annie Forshee, born May 10, 1885; died February 03, 1960 in St. Francois County, Missouri.  She married Henry Marler; born January 22, 1880; died August 20, 1964.

 

More About Annie Forshee:

Burial: February 1960

 

More About Henry Marler:

Burial: August 1964

 

43             vi.    Jessie Pearl Forshee, born May 09, 1888 in Jefferson County, Missouri; died January 25, 1973 in Riverside, California.  She married Eli Hobaugh December 24, 1905 in Flat River, Missouri; born March 15, 1884 in St. Francois County, Missouri; died May 26, 1970 in Riverside, California.

 

More About Jessie Pearl Forshee:

Burial: January 1973

 

More About Eli Hobaugh:

Burial: May 1970

 

44            vii.    Samuel Henry Forshee, born October 13, 1890; died February 13, 1973 in St. Francois County, Missouri.  He married Mary Caroline Morris August 04, 1911.

 

More About Samuel Henry Forshee:

Burial: February 1973

 

45           viii.    Myrtle Mae Forshee, born December 29, 1894; died July 28, 1974 in St. Francois County, Missouri.  She married Wesley Fielding Albaugh; born March 17, 1895 in St. Francois County, Missouri; died June 27, 1989 in Missouri.

 

More About Myrtle Mae Forshee:

Burial: July 1974

 

More About Wesley Fielding Albaugh:

Burial: June 1989

 

46             ix.    Genivieve Ambrozine Forshee, born September 29, 1901; died 1941.  She married Charles Haggard Lawson December 24, 1920; born September 22, 1897.

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